Author Archive for: Boldexpress

Jenny Jenny

About Jenny Jenny

  • How You Can Care For Your Denim [JEANS]

    1. Soak your denim in vinegar
    Whether you paid chump change for a pair of black jeans or spent half your paycheck on indigo-dyed selvedge denim, the goal is to keep the original color. Water itself will wash away your denim’s dye over time, and soap will only hasten the process.
    Try soaking your jeans in cold water and vinegar instead of washing them. Yes, vinegar. Add one cup of distilled white vinegar to a cold water bath and soak your jeans for about an hour. Hang or lay flat to dry, and don’t worry about smelling like vinegar—the odor goes away after your pants dry. This technique locks in the dye’s color, keeping your jeans dark and your furniture clean.
    And if you must use a washing machine, toss in a cup of vinegar on a hand-wash setting—but please, no detergent.

    2. Give your trousers a light steam shower
    Water, both warm and hot, not only fades your denim—it causes shrinkage. If you’re barely able to squirm into your skinny jeans, a hot bath is the last thing they need. Even if you don’t use a dryer, hot water will cause fabric to expand and then shrink.
    Unless you’ve been playing in mud, your jeans probably aren’t very dirty. A quick way to freshen them up is to hang them in your bathroom while you shower. Steam from your aromatic shower will soon have your dark blues smelling new, and a small amount of water vapor won’t make the fabric swell.

    3. Hang your jeans outside
    Your dryer poses just as much of a threat to your denim as the washer. High temperatures will make your jeans shrink, and all the tumbling leads to unnecessary wear and tear.
    If it’s a nice day outside, hang your favorite pair outdoors. Having your jeans air out gives them a rejuvenated scent—just make sure they’re out of direct sunlight. The bright star we refer to as “the sun” can bleach your dark jeans faster than you’d think.

    4. Freeze your jeans
    Got an impromptu date and need to quickly freshen up your luscious raw denim? Stick your pants in the freezer for a few hours to temporarily eliminate odors.
    Raw, or “dry” denim is denim that hasn’t been washed after dye is applied. The appeal of these jeans is their unique way their aesthetic develops over time. The rule of thumb for raw denim is to not wash them for six months. Washing will fade the dye too quickly; wearing them for an extended period of time will naturally fade certain areas and distress others. In other words, given enough time, raw denim becomes totally you.
    Since water is the last thing you want to touch these types of jeans, you can freeze them for a quick refresh. Freezing kills some bacteria, and bacteria are the prime cause of unpleasant odors. This isn’t a sure-fire fix, though—plenty of other bacteria must be heated if you want them to go away.

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  • Innovation isn’t… Below are some of the false ideas that prevent people from becoming innovative. Innovation isn’t… …just something geniuses do When you read the examples on the previous page, you might have thought that, while the ideas were clever and interesting, they were probably all dreamed up by people in lab coats or creative […]

    Creativity vs. Innovation

    Innovation isn’t…

    Below are some of the false ideas that prevent people from becoming innovative. Innovation isn’t…

    …just something geniuses do

    When you read the examples on the previous page, you might have thought that, while the ideas were clever and interesting, they were probably all dreamed up by people in lab coats or creative geniuses like Leonardo da Vinci, not people like you. The reality, however, is that in all of these cases someone did a number of very repeatable things that we can all learn to do. For example, James Dyson paid enough attention to the way things worked to notice how inefficient his Hoover was and how efficient the saw mill air cleaning equipment was and put the two things together.

    …just about having bright ideas

    You may still think that innovation is just about having clever ideas. It isn’t. The key difference between innovation and creativity – the bright ideas bit – is that innovation turns ideas into products, services or processes that really make a positive difference to the way your organisation does business. That’s why taking a great idea that you discover when you’re out shopping, at the cinema or talking with friends in the pub and applying it to the work that you do is just as valid a piece of innovation as having the idea yourself. It’s the outcome that’s important, not whose idea it was. On that note, innovation isn’t…

    …just about you

    You may think that you’re not the kind of person who has lots of ideas, or even spots them when they’re out and about. This doesn’t stop you being a great leader of innovation. It’s likely that you have people working for you or colleagues or even bosses, who have great ideas, but don’t share them or follow them through. This may be because they lack confidence, structure, follow through or something else. Whatever the reason, your contribution, as a leader of innovation, can be to draw out and listen to their ideas and then help shape them so that they can be turned into something valuable. Actually, enabling other people’s innovation is possibly a more productive contribution than having and implementing the ideas yourself. By doing this you can be responsible for many more ideas being turned into something useful than you could ever come up with and implement yourself.

    …and finally

    Make sure that you’re not a blockage to innovation. If your response to ideas is always to forensically dissect them and to point out the reasons why they won’t work, people may keep their valuable ideas to themselves. That’s not to say that you should take every idea at face value; not every one is worth exploring, obviously. Just be careful how you receive ideas and explore them with people. Just be aware that what you might think of as a logical examination of the pros and cons of an idea can feel like a personal attack to the person whose idea it is.

    The five essential entrepreneurial skills for success: concentration, discrimination, organisation, innovation and communication.

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